“I am a willow”

Some soundcloud this is

to ride on

I apologise

for the history

of hanging sentances

of hanging on

 

I hope you are happy as palm trees

or snow

either way with breeze

but not in snow

I don’t dig the windy snow

 

 

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Drafting Process Depicted in Steps

I find some humor in these writing mishaps

I.  Guns of the Trees pounds the skull of the viewer with violin and instensity – mechanical depictions of absurdity through camera shots of coney island junkyards and dead machines in piles all seen by the camera – the camera becoming hyperfractured self in the realization of maddness.   Ginsberg’s poetry takes us there in the cognitive – that where that we reached via senses from violins or again the images of the machines, the sorrrow across the Brunette’s face.  As she asks, “What do you believe in?”.  And the camera watches her, but then move

II.  Guns of the Trees takes us with the actors in their “boats” down to the scrapyards and industrial docks of New York City even as Ginsberg reads out “Sunflower Sutra” – they are taking us to the “Tincan Banna Docks” where we see something of America having trampeled itself?

III. Abernathy Farm Interior

IV.             Guns of the Trees and Pull My Daisy both aspire to beat culture – gospels of improvisation, glorification of Jazz culture – the persistant themes of annui, anti-capitalism and of course Allan Ginsberg.  Guns of the Trees features a potent scene in a junlkyard; while charecters engage in setting and in each other, Ginsberg reads from “Sunflower Sutra” and an old man talks about how free he was when he was a merchant marine.  The film adapts GInsberg’s poem as per Bazin’s “Cinema as Digest”, Benjamin’s “Task of the Translator” & so weiter – aber what strikes me is this one scene in the junk yard and the confrontations of the individuals with the utter destruction and destitution of post modernity.  “Dark Night of the SOul” as it were, or as Kaufman wrote “never was a night that ended or began”  or simply just the terror on the Brunette’s face.

V.  Guns of the Trees and Pull My Daisy both aspire to beat culture – gospels of improvisation, glorification of Jazz culture – the persistant themes of annui, anti-capitalism and of course Allan Ginsberg.  Guns of the Trees features a potent scene in a junlkyard; while charecters engage in setting and in each other, Ginsberg reads from “Sunflower Sutra” and an old man talks about how free he was when he was a merchant marine.      Thus and by these means – of violins and of painful depictions of desperation – the frustration and fragmentation of charecterscomes to be in insane interludes – Guns of the Trees performs and adaptation of Ginsberg’s poem from text to film.  So too stands Pull My Daisy as an interaction of film and Ginsberg; this time with with the poet on screen while Keroauc speaks the party for the party from off screen,

VI.  Guns of the Trees and Pull My Daisy both aspire to beat culture – gospels of improvisation, glorification of Jazz culture – the persistent themes of annui, anti-capitalism and of course Allan Ginsberg.  Guns of the Trees features a potent scene in a junkyard; while characters engage in setting and in each other, Ginsberg reads from “Sunflower Sutra” and an old man talks about how free he was when he was a merchant marine.   Thus and by these means – of violins and of painful depictions of desperation – the frustration and fragmentation of characters comes to be in insane interludes – Guns of the Trees performs and adaptation of Ginsberg’s poem from text to film.  So too stands Pull My Daisy as an interaction of film and Ginsberg; this time with with the poet on screen while Kerouac speaks the party for the party from off screen,      In particular I focus upon the events that happen during the “Is baseball holy?” sequence at the house party in the apartment – in this moment we cross diogesis into dissolve cuts that take us backwards in time.  This affords us the spectacle of accidentally self mocking Prosthelytizers standing before impassioned masses (perhaps yearning for some greater freedom). Both of these moments explore the profound disillusionment and alienation that the subject experiences in post modernism – yet they also explore the genre of improvisation and play with the role of the camera on screen.

VII.  Guns of the Trees and Pull My Daisy both aspire to beat culture – gospels of improvisation [“first thought, best thought” (Kerouac 3)], glorification of Jazz culture – the persistent themes of annui, anti-capitalism and of course Allan Ginsberg.  Guns of the Trees features a potent scene in a junkyard; while characters engage in setting and in each other, Ginsberg reads from “Sunflower Sutra” and an old man talks about how free he was when he was a merchant marine.  Thus and by these means – of violins and of painful depictions of desperation – the frustration and fragmentation of actors comes to be in insane interludes – Guns of the Trees performs and adaptation of Ginsberg’s poem from text to film.  So too stands Pull My Daisy as an interaction of film and Ginsberg; this time with with the poet on screen while Kerouac speaks the party for the party from off screen, In particular I focus upon the events that happen during the “Is baseball holy?” sequence at the house party in the apartment – in this moment we cross diogesis into dissolve cuts that take us backwards in time.  This affords us the spectacle of accidentally self mocking Prosthelytizers standing before impassioned masses (perhaps yearning for some greater freedom) – the American Flag is seen to obscure a Bishop.

Both of these moments explore the profound disillusionment and alienation that the subject experiences in post modernism – yet they also explore the genre of improvisation and play with the role of the camera on screen.  Namely the exploration and interaction of actors with the camera; direct address is a factor in each films case, but there is more at work as well.  The camera travels into actors memories and perceptions.  In Guns of the Trees the camera can see the ghouls of capitalism traversing a cabbage patch landscape evocative of biopolitical depictions of the individual as proceesed and packaged for the perpetuation of that self same act.  At times the Ghouls speak with the most derranged of our charecters, the camera see’s this when other actors cannot.  Meanwhile in Pull my Daisy we have thise “holy baseball” scene where the camera hears this question that pauses both diogetic conversation (the actors simply stare out with vacant faces, some direct address) as well as the Kerouac non-diegetic narration.  In the stark silence the camera travels with the reverie of the Bishop / Wife / Bishop’s Crew – they go to a memory we mentioned earlier.

When “Catalina Fight Song” Sticks in Your Head

pushing petals to the weekend

keep something sweet and free

pushing petals for the weekend

so you can smile at me

 

die every minute

don’t discuss peace

they’re high in the bathroom

their hope is out of reach

 

pushing petals for the weekend

so you can fly with me

I’m dying in the evening

sweating in summer heat

 

pushing petals to the weekend

Gonna get our kicks for free